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Venice Police assist with recovery of 2 more dolphins 8/9

Post Date:08/09/2018 10:58 AM

Master Police Officer Paul Joyce with the Venice Police Marine Unit assisted Mote Marine Laboratory Thursday morning with the recovery of 2 more deceased adult bottlenose dolphins in the area – one on Siesta Key and another, estimated at 10 feet long, from North Casey Key in Nokomis.
Another deceased dolphin was recovered at 1:30 a.m. Thursday morning from Turtle Beach, according to Mote. MPO Joyce did not assistin this recovery.

MPO Joyce assisted with the recovery of 6 deceased dolphins from Venice area waters on Tuesday and Wednesday – one juvenile, the rest adult.
Two of the dolphins were recovered Tuesday from Gulf waters in Venice.
On Wednesday at 8:30 a.m., a juvenile was recovered in the Intracoastal behind Venice Yacht Club. At 9:45, an adult was found beached on Brohard, south of the Paw Park. Both of these dolphins were taken to the Marina Park boat ramp off East Venice Avenue. With the assistance of Venice Public Works and SeaTow, the dolphins were loaded into a truck and transported to Mote Marine. About 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, MPO Joyce was notified by Mote of a deceased dolphin in the North Casey Key area. As that report came in, Mote received a report of another dolphin off Casey Key. MPO Joyce and FWC then went out and recovered both dolphins and proceeded to the Higel boat ramp, where they met Mote Marine staff for transport.
Three of the dolphins recovered Tuesday and Wednesday were male, and three female.

MPO Joyce said red tide is more than likely a factor in the dolphin deaths. Mote will conduct necropsies to determine cause.

MPO Joyce asks all boaters to be more cautious while on the water during these times of red tide. Manatees are more likely to be closer to the surface of the water while they try to breathe. Plus with our waters very dark and brackish, it makes it that much more difficult to see a manatee. If you see any manatee, sea turtle, or dolphin deceased or in distress, please call your local marine authority; they can also be reached on your marine VHF radio on channel 16. You can also call the FWC at 888-404-3922 or Mote Marine at 941-988-0212.